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3 posts from December 2010

24 December 2010

White Christmas

Unsurprisingly work has come to a standstill at the house, it being very "Mums shop at Iceland" there right now. Yep. Down in Devon snow is refusing to budge, and with the sun out today too, it is all rather incredibly beautiful.

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So after I took some snaps......

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...of my studio.....

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....of one of the bathrooms......

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...of the exterior of the "master" bathroom (such a funny phrase - what about the "mistress" bathroom? Or just, er..., bathroom?).....

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......and the dressing room, I went skiing. 

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Wishing all a wonderful, world-of-white Christmas and a world-of-colour in 2011.



13 December 2010

Big Bang

Though it's a shame to see the magical, ice-encrusted landscape give way to one more typically greasy hopefully the (reportedly transient) warmer temperatures will prevent the replacement boiler in the shower belonging to SEC, our asbestos chaps, exploding - as it did last week. No shower. No removal of highly toxic asbestos. No getting on with the rest of the works.



02 December 2010

A Small Victory

In spite of being told by a number of people our water damaged parquet floor is unsalvageable I have found two specialist "floor revivers" who say it can be repaired. Never give up. And actually now the guys have ripped the stuff up in one of the bedrooms it is clear it's a simple floating tongue and groove floor which, as I say in my book, is the one to lay as a DIY-er. And as we can salvage just enough to effect a repair this is what we are going to do. 

Of course all of them say that given the time and cost of repair you may as well have put in a new floor but actually this is not true for four reasons: 1) a new floor will look too new 2) the product is no longer in manufacture so cannot be replaced like for like 3) repair will cost less than replacement and 4) to replace perfectly good flooring is simply not acceptable environmentally.

As I repeatedly advise don't listen to the experts per se but get lots of expert advice and make your own judgement. 

The flooring in the adjacent dining room is another challenge as the concrete floor beneath is more of a delicately contoured landscape, begging for a model train set. I had wanted to use some terrazzo floor tiles here but I think they are simply too thick: digging out to create the right level will chew into our already well nibbled contingency as a result of asbestos and leaks - so I am considering a 6mm thick tile instead. It's so difficult to find a floor tile for a living space like a dining room that isn't either boringly tasteful or just bad taste though - but I have a plan. More to follow.

The Japanese wallpaper in the hallway, the one we planned to preserve, now has a nice bloom of mould thanks to the leak through the roof so we'll have to completely re-wallpaper here, that's assuming there's no asbestos beneath.

Talking of which we have daily discoveries of even more of this bloody stuff.

But back on the up side this is because the builders are making progress, which builders always do at the beginning of a job - and in fact at the end - it's just the middle bit that always feels slow - even though it's not really.

And in spite of the set backs, which is the case on every build to be honest, I do love a building site.

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THE MASTER BEDROOM

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VIEW TO MY STUDIO FROM THE ADJACENT SHOWER ROOM

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DE-HUMIDIFIER IN THE GUEST BEDROOM

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OUR GRACIOUS DINING ROOM WITH VIEW INTO THE KITCHEN